Considering older child adoption

| Aug 11, 2017 | Family Law

Making the decision to adopt is a life-changing choice, and it can take a great deal of thought and consideration to come to that decision. But once you’ve made that decision, there are a lot of other things to consider: Will you go for an open or closed adoption? Will you adopt a newborn child or an older child?

This blog will present some of the considerations to take on board when thinking about going through an older child adoption — that is, to adopt a child aged 6 or older.

A shorter waiting list

Many people prefer to adopt babies at birth, so by adopting an older child, you will probably be able to do so sooner because of the lower demand.

Life history

Adopting an older child will mean that they likely know their biological parents. This will give you more information to work with when helping with their past, their grief and their problems, helping them to grow through it.

Discovering their needs

You will be able to detect the child’s needs more quickly. This means that if they have a learning difficulty or other disability, you will be able to provide them with what they need from the word “go”.

Forming bonds

It might be more difficult to form a bond with an older child. They will have likely been through a great deal of trauma, and might be resistant to the love that you try to offer them. However, you are giving love and hope to a child who over time might open up and work through his or her issues with you as his or her parent.

Source: The spruce, “Advantages and Disadvantages of Baby Adoption vs. Older Child Adoption,” Carrie Craft, accessed Aug. 11, 2017

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